Sunday, April 19, 2015

Days out: Fledborough Viaduct

This wasn't really a day out, but I'd gone to visit Mum over the Easter weekend and we decided to go for a walk to the viaduct close to a local village. Fledborough Viaduct is on a now defunct railway line (once the Lancashire, Derbyshire & East Coast railway), and is now part of National Cycle Route 647. We planned to use a footpath nearby to walk under the viaduct and then loop back round.

The viaduct itself is absolutely huge, and runs for a very long way across the fields even before it crosses the Trent.


This is what was Fledborough Station, now overgrown and with just a station sign and a seat left. The path on what was the track is good and clearly marked and would be great for both walking and cycling.


We walked along the edge of a field and still the viaduct stretched into the distance.


The sheep were very interested in what we were doing, although they ran away if they thought we were too close to their lambs! One of them seemed to have quadruplets!


Unfortunately the footpath got a little, erm, wet, further on, so we had to take a different route.


But that meant we saw a toad!


Our walk ended back where we had started, where we'd parked the car outside St Gregory's Church in Fledborough. The church is huge and echoey, and disused. It's now run by the Churches Conservation Trust, so is open every day to visitors. I couldn't quite see where the original congregation would have come from as there only seemed to be three houses in the village, plus a few farms further away, and the church really is huge!


Have you been on any walks recently?

2 comments:

Evelyn Hender said...

wow that looks like an amazing place to walk or cycle. Going to have to work out how long it would take us to get there from Bedfordshire as my in-laws live South of Lincoln and would enjoy meeting up for a cycle ride.

ShinyNewThing said...

According to Wikipedia: "During the 18th century the church gained a degree of notoriety because its rector, Rev W. Sweetapple, granted licences for marriage to runaway couples."